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Esotericism, Occultism, Magic, and Mysticism.
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Ars Mysteriorum
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 10:37 pm    Post subject: Esotericism, Occultism, Magic, and Mysticism. Reply with quote

I thought I'd open myself up to questions on all this fun stuff I've been studying to help me use my resources in new ways.

If there's anything you'd like to know about alchemy, magical and mystic traditions, astrology, Hermeticism, Gnosticism, and Super Nintendo RPGs, I'd be happy to research and give you the full beef on it.
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JimmySwill
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, I'll bite.

Tell me something of the Rosicrucians. I've come across their mention a few times, but I never could figure out what they were/are all about.
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Ars Mysteriorum
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JimmySwill wrote:
Ok, I'll bite.

Tell me something of the Rosicrucians. I've come across their mention a few times, but I never could figure out what they were/are all about.


Excellent! I have a heap of books on them, but haven't delved deeply into them due to the direction my papers went.

I'll do some research and put up my response before I get to work on the setting on Sunday.
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Ars Mysteriorum
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry this was a bit rushed, but I believe it will answer you better than any wikipedia article will.

And away we go.

The important bit of information to keep in mind is that Rosicrucianism was a Protestant movement, and can be seen as an attempt to create a deep tradition of faith that the simplicity of Protestantism (via the edict of sola scriptura, or 'the bible alone') lacked in comparison to the speculative biblical traditions of Catholicism.

Rosicrucianism's origins is traced back to 1614, influenced by the works of the Protestant Christian mystic Jacob Boehme. Three texts (all with fun German titles I can't even type, save for the Fama Fraternitatis) began the movement, and were followed up with the famous work The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreuz in the Year of 1459 (remember this is at a time when the age of a work and its attribution to legendary personages validated its authority, if not its authenticity; it was very common to falsely date works in order to attract the interest of the scholarly elite).

These writings were highly successful and saw reprints, proving their popularity with the learned of Europe. Praise and polemics were both bandied about, with seekers of the origins of the works, which contained both Christianized Hermetic concepts intermarried with alchemy (some even claimed Moses to be the origin of the wisdom, which was common; Hermes Trismegistus, for whom Hermeticism is named, was thought to be a contemporary of Moses until Isaac Casaubon dated the Corpus Hermeticum to the 1st century AD at the earliest in 1614) and those accusing the authors of diabolic pacts.

What we see in these early works is a marrying of Christian mythology (the Holy Grail), John Dee's esoteric works (the significance of the cross from a geometrical and numerological perspective, as well as perhaps the idea of communicating with angels to gain wisdom), Paracelsus (the significance of the rose in Rosicrucian, or Rosy Cross, thought as well as astrological and elemental concepts), Kabbalah (praised for its wisdom in the Fama Fraternitatis), ancient philosophy (inherent to any work of Western esotericism), and Islam (inherent to any alchemical tradition). The occult sciences of astrology and alchemy were also incorporated into Rosicrucian works.

The supreme quality and presentation of ancient and medieval wisdom traditions within the light of Protestant Christianity proved intoxicating for those who sought for deeper wisdom beyond the limitation of only utilizing the bible for spiritual fulfillment.

There is much, much more than what I have written here.

It's important to bear in mind that to explore the depths of Rosicrucianism requires in depth explanations of all those traditions it drew upon to formulate its own world views.

However, perhaps you can see the intoxicating features when they are rendered more simply:

Tobias Churton in Invisibles: The True History of the Rosicrucians wrote:
The Rosicrucian movement can be traced back to the very early 17th century to the present day. However, the movement's dominant writings claimed to go back even further, to the adventures of a runaway monk from the 14th century (Rosenkreuz) who had escaped the narrow-mindedness of hsi cloister to explore the fabled vistas of the middle east. The movement began with a fantasy, a story that seemed to ring curiously true in the minds of some outstanding men and women. The fantasy spoke of a House of the Holy Spirit founded by frater C. R. (Christian Rozenkreuz) - and this itself was only a late instance of a much older tradition. The older tradition, revealed by frater C. R. by the wise men of 'Damcar' in Arabia (according to the first 'Rosicrucian manifesto') had, it was alleged, provided the secret language of a pristine, angelic religion, unspoilt by fallen human hands. Knowledge of that supernal tongue had manifested itself among the truly wise (the chosen vessels) since time immemorial.

Higher intelligence could be acquired through contact with angels.


Since the introduction of the prisca theologia (or the 'primordial faith' from which all faiths sprung) by Marcilio Ficino, esotericists have sought to find the true faith capable of allowing man to realize his greatest, spiritual potential by searching within other, older traditions.

The 'curiously true' sensations a believer experiences are what draw any to a particular religion. Rosicrucianism was not different in that aspect, but offered a deeper connection between man, the universe, and god and a means through which man could call upon the heavens to attain secret wisdom.

Sounds pretty cool to me.






References:
Edighoffer, Roland, 'Rosicrucianism I: First hald of the 17th Century' in Dictionary of Gnosis and Western Esotericism, ed. by Wouter J. Hanegraaff and others (Leiden: Brill, 2006), 1009-1014

Churton, Tobias, Invisibles: The True History of the Rosicrucians (Hersham, UK: Lewis Masonic, 2009)

Work on my previous essays.
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JimmySwill
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Damn. That's more than I anticipated. Thanks Ars M!

I only have a moment, but I want to reread this in the morning when I have some more time to digest. -This already gave me a nice idea.

I didn't know it was a Protestant thing. But, speaking the language of angels is awesome.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So are the Rosy Cross folk still active?

You know, you could take what you wrote here Ars M, switch some names, and you'd have a great sect for a campaign. I could see a Typhonic sect that is searching for deeper roots, and maybe even knowledge.

Not these names are at all uninteresting: The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreuz. Why chemical?

And, was there something about the Rosicrucians and the Grail? Did Rosenkreuz gain some insight about it in his Middle East journey?
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Gregory Vrill
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, site outage nixed my response.

Nice post Ars, crazy stuff. My interest in this stems from Foucault's Pendulum.

Next stop, how about some of the weirder alchemical traditions/operations: where they came from, what they meant? Like making a homunculus.
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Ars Mysteriorum
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gregory Vrill wrote:
Yeah, site outage nixed my response.

Nice post Ars, crazy stuff. My interest in this stems from Foucault's Pendulum.

Next stop, how about some of the weirder alchemical traditions/operations: where they came from, what they meant? Like making a homunculus.


Luckily, all this is fresh in my mind after my last essay.

Let's get the philosophical background of alchemy first. Here's an excerpt from my essay (ignore the numbers, those are footnotes).

Ars Mysteriorum wrote:
The works of Plato (c. 427–347 B.C.E.) were as crucial to the formation of the science of the alchemical process as they were to the divine worldview of Hermetism, and Aristotle (384-322 B.C.E.) expounded on Plato’s works in a manner that served to inspire alchemists from antiquity, such as Zosimos of Panoplis,71 to those of the Enlightenment, such as Sir Isaac Newton.72 This section of the essay will examine the philosophical concepts of matter and form (or hylopmorphism, the fourfold element theory, and then explore how these concepts were utilized to create a science thought capable of connecting man to the divine.

The philosophical pursuit of the prima materia is a hallmark of alchemy, the essential first substance which a base metal must be reduced to in order to perfect it into gold.73 Plato introduced the alchemically significant concept of matter and form in Timaeus, stating:

"Wherefore the mother and receptacle of all created and visible and in any way sensible things is not to be termed with earth or air or fire or water, or any of their compounds, or any of the elements from which these are derived, but is an invisible and formless being which receives all things and in some mysterious way partakes of the intelligible, and is most incomprehensible."74

Aristotle (384-322 B.C.E.) was not content with this description of the prima materia as an ‘incomprehensible mother’. Aristotle defined matter as the passive principle in things, and form as the the motive, or pure activity.75 Aristotelianism charged this theory with the idea that all things are striving teleologically towards more complete forms; the amount of ‘matter’ decreasing and the amount of ‘form’ increasing as one ascends the hierarchy all the way up to God, the first unmoved mover and the cause of the chain of movement.76

The four elements have been mentioned, but in the quest for the prima materia a closer examination is warranted. The fourfold element theory of Empedocles’ (c. 490–430 B.C.E.)77 was refined by Plato through the injection of the concept that the elements were interconvertible, or that one element could become another.78 Aristotle sought to more deeply define this interconvertibility in order to ascertain the generation of the elements from the prima materia.79

"So at the center and round it [the earth-centered world] we get earth and water, the heaviest and coldest elements, by themselves; round them and contiguous with them, air and what we commonly call fire. It is not really fire, for fire is an excess of heat and a sort of ebullition; but in reality, of what we call air, the part surrounding the earth is moist and warm, because it contains both vapour and a dry exhalation from the earth. But the next part, above that, is warm and dry. For vapour is naturally moist and cold, exhalation warm and dry, and vapour is potentially like water, exhalation potentially like fire."80 [emphasis added]

The active causes (hot and cold) and passive causes (moist and dry)81 are the sensible qualities through which nature acts to manipulate the prima materia in order to cause it to become another element.82 Aristotle went on to describe the qualities of metals based on his theory of the four elements and sensible qualities and how they are combined in order to compose all matter, including metals.83 This understanding of the fundamental change of elements by the manipulation of the prima materia allows for the possibility of using nature’s effects on natural substances in order to shape a thing’s prima materia into a more complete form.84


Alchemy began as little more than altering the appearance of metals to look like gold in ancient Alexandria, but would receive its more well-known identity involving athanors, alembics, and planetary correspondences when Greek knowledge passed to the Arabs after the fall of Rome in 410 CE.

Ars Mysteriorum wrote:
The point where alchemy began to display a richer, more pronounced Aristotelianism was in Arab culture, in which the two figures of Jabir ibn Hayyan (eighth century) and Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyya al Razi, or Rhazes, (865-925) are prominent.

E. J. Holmyard states ‘Islamic alchemy never surpassed the level it attained with one of its earliest exponents, Jabir ibn Hayyan’.98 Jabir’s influence was well-marked, his name had over 3000 titles treating various ancient sciences attributed to it;99 many of which are likely spurious.100 Aristotle’s fourfold elemental scheme is present in Jabir’s works, as is the concept of the planetary correlations to metals.101 Jabir posited that, under the influence of the planets, metals were formed in the earth by the union of sulphur (which provided the ‘hot’ and ‘dry’ qualities) and mercury (‘cold’ and ‘moist’).102 Paracelsus built from Jabir’s Two Principles of Sulphur and Mercury to codify his Three Principles of Sulphur, Mercury, and Salt, correlating each to the spirit, soul, and body.103 Paracelsus’ Three Principles resonated with Christian alchemists due to its connection to the Holy Trinity, and it found support from Jacob Boehme (1575-1624) as well as the Rosicrucians in the seventeenth century,104where Paracelsianism served as an important impetus.105

Jabir also explored the limitless possibilities of the alchemist capable of manipulating the prima materia, thereby imitating the world-creating demiurge.106 The artificial procreation of the homonculus, the use of alchemy medicinally to create a panacea to cure the sick, and the usage of other materials than metal in alchemy.107 It is also noteworthy that Jabir contributed the use of nitric acid to dissolve gold to the world of modern chemistry and also provided illustrations of furnaces that were highly prized in the alchemical world.108


Paracelsus also deserves mention, though his type of alchemy was spagyric (herbal alchemy). Still, his thoughts on the movements of the planets and stars affecting one's health and postulation on elemental spirits are noteworthy (and also where concepts of gnomes, salamanders, undines, and sylphs as elemental spirits come from).

The ultimate concept here is that alchemy is not 'magic'. It may have had religious symbolism injected into it, but it was indeed a science in which natural components were combined and treated via natural methods to create natural results. The divinity or supernatural qualities (which is kind of an null term in my vocabulary, as anything occurring in nature is natural) of the material world were assumed, but not relied upon.

A better way to term alchemy would perhaps be to call it an 'occult science'; for it was indeed secretive in order to usher others along a path of enlightenment that came with understanding the natural world.

So what is magic? Read on if you wish for an explanation. I've already treated this topic in another forum and shall repost it here.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There are a few influential views I shall address, as drawn from my Dictionary of Gnosis and Western Esotericism, a gigantic collection of essays from scholars in the field of Western esotericism. This particular essay outlining the scholarly views of magic is attributed to Wouter J. Hanegraaff in his article 'Magic I: Introduction' in the Dictionary of Gnosis and Western Esotericism.

Here follows a brief summary:

Intellectualist
This view comes from E. B. Tylor and J. G. Frazer. To them the idea of magic is 'the error of mistaking ideal analogy for real connexion'. Tylor states of primitive man that:

Tylor wrote:
'having come to associate in thought those things which he found by experience to be connected in fact, proceeded to erroneously to invert this action, and to conclude that association in thought must involve similar connexion in reality. He thus attempted to discover, to foretell, and to cause events by means of processes which we can now see to habe only an ideal significance'


For Tylor, science is the primary reference point in understanding the nature of magic. His attempts to describe magic as something separate from animism/religion (the belief in spiritual beings) proved impossible to maintain. Still, to this day it can be said that many hold the view that magic is a thing separate from animism/religion, but anyone who delves deeply into the studies of different magical traditions will find this to be not so. Tylor did use the term 'occult science' to describe his version of 'magic', a term now ascribed to practices such as alchemy and astrology.

J. G. Frazer simplified Tylor's views into an evolutionary form of belief. Magic (sympathetic magic to Frazer, again excluding spiritual beings) is the earliest and most primitive stage of development in man, religion coming next, with science at the top of the chain as the most advanced stage.

Again, this mirrors the views of mainstream society, where magic is an outdated mode of thought for primitive minds.

Functionalist
Marcel Mauss and Emile Durkheim are names attached to this view. Mauss rejected Frazer's intellectualist model focused on ideas and posited a functionalist model that focused on ritual action, defining a 'magical rite' as 'any rite that is nor part of an organized cult: a rite that is private, secret, mysterious, and ultimately tending towards one that is forbidden'.

Durkheim outlined essentially the same approach on the basis of circular reasoning. He assumed a 'marked repugnance of religion for magic and the hostility of magic to religion in return' and concluded that 'there is something inherently anti-religious about the maneuvers of the magician'.

Simply put, religion is social, whereas magic is inherently non-social. Hanegraaff states of the functionalist model:

Hanegraaff wrote:
'Close study of Mauss' original discussion, from which Durkheim's was derived, show that the assumptions basic to the theory that are derived from the traditional categories of Christian heresiology: paranoid conceptions of magic as practices of the unsocialized 'other' are thus adopted, quite uncritically, as the foundation for a purportedly academic study of what magic is all about'


Participation
Lucien Lévy-Bruhl authored this view, though it was initially not intended as a theory of magic.

Lévy-Bruhl attempted to create a theory in order to come to grips with what he originally called the 'pre-logical' thinking or mentality of supposedly prominent in 'primitive' cultures: instead of a worldviewbased upon 'instrumental causality' (i.e. one that assumes the presence of secondary causes or intervening mechanisms that mediate between causes and effects), typical of modern culture, primitives seemed to have a world-view based upon 'participation' (where causes and effects could be seen as associated to the point of identity and consubstantiality, without assuming the presence of intermediary links). Lévy-Bruhl eventually came to recognize that participation constituted a primary and irreducible human constant, present in any society, whether primative or modern.

So what is participation simply put? God/fate/spiritual beings/magic is/are responsible for (or participate in) an event and thus define its means and ends.

Later authors equated participation and magic, thus defining magic as 'a different kind of rationality'.

Hanegraaff points out that simply because much of magic is based on such frameworks does not logically imply that those frameworks can in turn be called magic. Still, this view has served to deepen the confusion on how to define magic.

So what is magic?
What is clear is that there is a sharp distinction between religion and magic [in the above views]. Let's draw a bottom line we can all relate to.

Look at your popular fantasy RPG. Can wizards typically cast healing and holy spells? No, usually that remains the domain of priests. Likewise summoning bolts of energy and other fantastical powers are the purview of magicians.

Hanegraaff states that magic and religion have long been separated in our culture due to theological polemics internal to Christianity (magicians are evil and dark, priests are good and holy).

So what is magic? Hanegraaff looks at political and social factors in Western culture in order to help better define magic.

His statement is this:

Hanegraaff wrote:
In the post-colonial period Western-scholars have become more sensitive about issues of ethnocentrism and Eurocentric arrogance, but the logical step of discarding the category of "magic" has not been taken. Many authors opt for half-way solutions such as speaking about "magic" while admitting it is a form of "religion", but without explaining in what then relies its specificity. Others use adjectives such as "magico-religious", but again without specifying in what respect this category is different from "religion" pure and simple. A more consistent and historically more fruitful approach would be to start by recognizing the religious pluralism that has in fact always characterized Western culture, and analyze magic as a largely polemical concept that has been used by various religious interest groups either to describe their own religious beliefs and practices or - more frequently - to discredit those of others. If any concept of magic is still considered necessary at all, it might be used as the common denominator of "a discursive field, in which different Occidentalist definitions of deluded or illusory beliefs were accompanied by doubts about the extent to which they were deluded, illusory, backward, or irrational".


Essentially, magic can be equated with religion, 'pure and simple'.

Referenced from:
Hanegraaff, Wouter J., 'Magic I: Introduction' in Dictionary of Gnosis and Western Esotericism, ed. by Wouter J. Hanegraaff and others (Leiden: Brill, 2006), 716-719

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I hope this was rather informative!
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Ars Mysteriorum
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JimmySwill wrote:
So are the Rosy Cross folk still active?

You know, you could take what you wrote here Ars M, switch some names, and you'd have a great sect for a campaign. I could see a Typhonic sect that is searching for deeper roots, and maybe even knowledge.

Not these names are at all uninteresting: The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreuz. Why chemical?

And, was there something about the Rosicrucians and the Grail? Did Rosenkreuz gain some insight about it in his Middle East journey?


Ah, don't you know it?! This stuff is fuel for Arkoth and potential adventures in its world.

It's called the 'Chemical Wedding' because it's an allegory for alchemy told as a wedding party (and a very bizarre one at that).

The concept of Quest for the Grail in Rosicrucianism is a journey of personal enlightenment, so I would assume the answer is yes. I'll want to read more before I give any definitive answers on that.

It's likely that Christian Rosenkreuz is a pseudoepigraphical figure, not unlike Hermes Trismegistus, though some state he was the Count of Saint-Germain (a purportedly immortal human who has been sighted time and time again throughout the annals of history).

So, what's this nice idea of yours?
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 7:35 am    Post subject: The World is a Greek Easter Egg. Reply with quote

Screw another game, just keep talking Ars.

The kids that know me know I could read what you wrote for awhile, it's just fun.

Quote:
Aristotelianism charged this theory with the idea that all things are striving teleologically towards more complete forms; the amount of ‘matter’ decreasing and the amount of ‘form’ increasing as one ascends the hierarchy all the way up to God, the first unmoved mover and the cause of the chain of movement.


That is crazy is a number of interesting ways.



Quote:
. I could see a Typhonic sect that is searching for deeper roots, and maybe even knowledge.


me too.

I can even imagine a name for its leader......and it consists of groups of one, and they are all very hungry.....

OK, so on a side note because I know Godfrey never reads this.

How would you feel about an NPC named Harlan Godfrey? That is my question to you Ars. Trust me it is a good and mystical question. If you prefer you can tell my about Gematria, or examine the name however you like. Is Harlan a villian, or hero?

Another side note, have you read The Corpus Hermeticum Ars? It was awhile ago for me, but I remember liking it, not that my memory is very trustworthy.....

3rd side, I like your writing style a good deal from what I saw. That's nice, as I am a horrible writer, in school, and privy to a great many literary crimes.

I am even want to commit a few of import. The worst was when a teacher marked "import" as an error on one of my papers......priceless.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:39 am    Post subject: Re: The World is a Greek Easter Egg. Reply with quote

greyfaced wrote:
Screw another game, just keep talking Ars.

Yes, this is quality stuff, Ars M. I agree with Greyfaced about the writing. It's very good.

Quote:
Look at your popular fantasy RPG. Can wizards typically cast healing and holy spells? No, usually that remains the domain of priests. Likewise summoning bolts of energy and other fantastical powers are the purview of magicians.

The division is there in Wayfarers, isn't it? However, the Hedge spell Fix purposefully breaks the boundary, which was suggested by Greg. Smile It's interesting, because we did put thought into this. -I suppose we always have.

I don't want to share my idea specifically. Not yet at least. I'm incubating it for my next game. But, here's and thought: The motivation for unification seems to be a recurrent theme. One that runs parallel with scientific explanation. What about divergence and fragmentation as a kind of truth? A path towards complexity and the unexplainable as enlightenment? Xeres? The opposite of Oneness?

Quote:
I can even imagine a name for its leader......and it consists of groups of one, and they are all very hungry.....
Yeah, Greyfaced.
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Ars Mysteriorum
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JimmySwill wrote:
So are the Rosy Cross folk still active?


Forgot to answer this.

Yes, in a sense. There are no groups today that can trace their lineage to the 17th century Rosicrucians, but there are those who practice their beliefs (though to what extent, I'm not certain).

AMORC (Ancient and Mystical Order Rosae Crucis) is perhaps the most notable.

Here is a list of others as well (you may need to resize your window to better read the poorly coded site).

greyfaced wrote:
OK, so on a side note because I know Godfrey never reads this.

How would you feel about an NPC named Harlan Godfrey? That is my question to you Ars. Trust me it is a good and mystical question. If you prefer you can tell my about Gematria, or examine the name however you like. Is Harlan a villian, or hero?


Sadly, I'm not a practitioner of any mystic or occult practices, but merely an observer.

I can tell you this: my studies and experiences have led me to discard notions of good and evil, as essentially all esoteric and exoteric traditions seek to redefine reality in order to allow practitioners to more actively participate with their surroundings beyond mundane capacities.

A better question to ask is what significance does Harlan draw from his own name? How does use the stars, planets, nature, and numerical qualities of his name to justify his actions?

Intuitive interpretation, or revelation, will allow you to make a far more interesting character.

greyfaced wrote:
Another side note, have you read The Corpus Hermeticum Ars? It was awhile ago for me, but I remember liking it, not that my memory is very trustworthy.....


I do indeed own it as well as the Asclepius and other discourses. I have referenced it quite often for my essays. Sadly, I have no read it all the way through, as my tendency is to clear my mind to ruminate wholly on a thing; something which I have no time to do and must remain focused on the topics of my essays. I'm slowly building a library of works I will read between my Master's and Doctorate.

greyfaced wrote:
3rd side, I like your writing style a good deal from what I saw. That's nice, as I am a horrible writer, in school, and privy to a great many literary crimes.

I am even want to commit a few of import. The worst was when a teacher marked "import" as an error on one of my papers......priceless.


That's a tremendous compliment. I have never been able to write in the past because I never felt passionate about what I wished to convey.

I care greatly about my studies and have worked to find the best possible paragraph and sentence structures to concisely (but profoundly) state my point in order to stay under the word limits of my essays. It's been formidable practice.

That last example is the assumption of many traditional educators that a person who does not have the best grammar necessarily does not have the best vocabulary.

'Assumption' and 'education' are concepts that have litte to do with one another.

JimmySwill wrote:
Yes, this is quality stuff, Ars M. I agree with Greyfaced about the writing. It's very good.


Again, that's high praise. Thank you very much.

JimmySwill wrote:
Quote:
Look at your popular fantasy RPG. Can wizards typically cast healing and holy spells? No, usually that remains the domain of priests. Likewise summoning bolts of energy and other fantastical powers are the purview of magicians.

The division is there in Wayfarers, isn't it? However, the Hedge spell Fix purposefully breaks the boundary, which was suggested by Greg. Smile It's interesting, because we did put thought into this. -I suppose we always have.


Actually, I spun it in a really fun way for Arkoth. The Ether is essentially the prima materia which takes on the form and becomes the matter of everything in existence.

Hedge magic is an incomplete spinning of the Ether, hence why illusions and transitory magic is only possible. The revival of the ability to create potions is considered a hallmark, but Hedge magic will likely never grow beyond this due to the creation of the Alchemist guilds (secretly founded by the Hermetic orders to utilize Hedge magic as a smokescreen to maintain their secrecy) that heavily regulate what alchemists may and may not do in their practices.

Hermetic magic is still practiced, though very much in secret. Members of the Hermetic Orders are very careful to either pose as alchemists or to use their magic discreetly in populated areas. The more adventurous wizards relish the opportunity to delve into forgotten ruins in order to unleash their full potential to aid their comrades and test their abilities.

This is not to necessarily say that Hermetic wizards quake in fear when their magic is discovered. The Orders have entrenched themselves well with the nobility and those in authority to assure silence and control information in order to sustain their secrecy. The rumors that are spread after such an event often serves to enhance their mystique when appropriately manipulated. Above all, the Orders are adept at always managing to find a spin on any event to work to their advantage.

But, I digress.

JimmySwill wrote:
I don't want to share my idea specifically. Not yet at least. I'm incubating it for my next game. But, here's and thought: The motivation for unification seems to be a recurrent theme. One that runs parallel with scientific explanation. What about divergence and fragmentation as a kind of truth? A path towards complexity and the unexplainable as enlightenment? Xeres? The opposite of Oneness?

Quote:
I can even imagine a name for its leader......and it consists of groups of one, and they are all very hungry.....
Yeah, Greyfaced.


Ah, I so want to play in Twylos!

I don't even know what you're alluding to, but it sounds like it would be a blast to play and find out!
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Ars Mysteriorum
Demiurge


Joined: 27 Sep 2008
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Location: Sioux Falls, SD, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm proud to announce that I just now found out that my essay on alchemy I quoted above received a Mark of Distinction and some rather welcome praise from my professor!
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JimmySwill
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers, Ars M!
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greyfaced
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Joined: 06 Jun 2008
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Location: Pleroma, Oregon

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

you wankers.....

I'm doing a survey on the name Harlan Godfrey, because someone might end up with it in about 6 months....

I'm checking it with gamers and giving the open comment period a try before I present it to the client who tasked me with giving him the best name for his PC that I can.

and the name was Grimlin....he was typhonae...or however you spell it.

k carry on.
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